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A new survey shows a majority of customers understand that real sugar comes from plants and is natural, according to the Sugar Association, the scientific arm of the U.S. sugar industry. About 80% of respondents agreed that “real sugar” is naturally occurring. The majority of respondents also agreed that sugar plays a role in a balanced diet. “”The results of this research tell a very different story from what people see and read about sugar in the context of books, fad diets, social media and news headlines,” said Courtney Gaine, president and CEO of the association. “Consumers like real sugar, and while many seek to monitor their intakes, they know that they can still enjoy it as part of many foods and see it as part of a healthy diet.”

Read the full article at: https://www.capitalpress.com/ag_sectors/research/survey-shows-more-customers-know-sugar-comes-from-plants/article_f0b01db2-fafb-11eb-a222-a75ea0264f1b.html

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