Eggnog – you either love it or hate it. But the polarizing beverage has been a treat during the holidays for hundreds of years. How did this polarizing drink come to be such a holiday tradition?

It turns out that eggnog’s origins haven’t always been tied to Christmastime. According to an article in Time magazine, historians debate the exact dates, most can agree that eggnog originated from a drink in early medieval Britain called posset, which is a hot, milky, ale-like drink. By the 1200s, monks were drinking posset with eggs and figs, which were foods of the wealthy and used in toasts to prosperity and good health.

It was American colonists in the 1700s who started made posset a holiday tradition; albeit with their own signature ingredient: rum! The term eggnog had stuck with Americans by the late 1700s.

The drink was so popular that even George Washington had his own recipe. While eggnog is readily available in grocery stores during the holidays, why not try making your own with the recipe below! Eggs are the star of the show in this recipe, but sugar is a key ingredient to add sweetness, texture and bulk to the beverage.

 

Ingredients:

 

Directions:

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Gradually add the 1/3 cup sugar and continue to beat until it is completely dissolved. Add the milk, cream, bourbon and nutmeg and stir to combine.
  2. Place the egg whites in the bowl of a stand mixer and beat to soft peaks. With the mixer still running gradually add the 1 tablespoon of sugar and beat until stiff peaks form.
  3. Whisk the egg whites into the mixture. Chill and serve.

 

For cooked eggnog, follow procedure below.

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Gradually add the 1/3 cup sugar and continue to beat until it is completely dissolved. Set aside.
  2. In a medium saucepan, over high heat, combine the milk, heavy cream and nutmeg and bring just to a boil, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and gradually temper the hot mixture into the egg and sugar mixture. Then return everything to the pot and cook until the mixture reaches 160 degrees F. Remove from the heat, stir in the bourbon, pour into a medium mixing bowl, and set in the refrigerator to chill.
  3. In a medium mixing bowl, beat the egg whites to soft peaks. With the mixer running gradually add the 1 tablespoon of sugar and beat until stiff peaks form. Whisk the egg whites into the chilled mixture.

 

Recipe sourced from the Food Network.

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