November 21, 2017

First and foremost, let’s be clear that the article we are discussing is not actually a study, but a perspective: a collection of speculations and assumptions about events that happened nearly five decades ago, conducted by a group of researchers and funded by individuals and organizations that are known critics of the sugar industry. It is also important to point out that the authors of this paper did not reach out to the Sugar Association to verify any of their assumptions.

However, given the sugar industry’s commitment to transparency, we reviewed our research archives and found documentation that the study in question ended for three reasons, none of which involved potential research findings: the study was significantly delayed; it was consequently over budget; and the delay overlapped with an organizational restructuring with the Sugar Research Foundation becoming a new entity, the International Sugar Research Foundation. There were plans to continue the study with funding from the British Nutrition Foundation, but, for reasons unbeknown to us, this did not occur.

Throughout its history, the Sugar Association has embraced scientific research and innovation in an attempt to learn as much as possible about sugar, diet and health. We know that sugar consumed in moderation is part of a balanced lifestyle,1,2,3 and we remain committed to supporting research to further understand the role sugar plays in consumers’ evolving eating habits. The bottom line: the Sugar Association will always advocate for and respect any comprehensive, peer-reviewed scientific research that provides insights and aids in our understanding of the role food and nutrition serve in our lives.

_______________________________

(1) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. December 2015. Available at http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/
(2) American Academy of Pediatrics. Policy Statement: Snacks, Sweetened Beverages, Added Sugars, and Schools. Pediatrics. 2015:135(3):575-583
(3) Goldfein KR, Slavin JL, Why Sugar is Added to Food: Food Science 101. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety. 2015:14:644-656.

More Press Releases

the sugar association

Statement by Courtney Gaine, PhD, RD, president and CEO of the Sugar Association Regarding the Issuance of the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

December 29, 2020

December 29, 2020 “On behalf of the Sugar Association and its members, I would like to thank the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (HHS) for their significant work in developing and finalizing the 2020-25 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs), and doing so on time, particularly in light of this challenging […]

the sugar association

More than 1,500 Consumers Urge FDA to Enact Comprehensive Artificial Sweetener Labeling Reform

November 19, 2020

Sharp increase in use of sugar substitutes & misleading labels drive calls for full transparency  (Washington, D.C. – November 19, 2020)  The Sugar Association’s Citizen Petition to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has garnered the support of more than 1,500 consumers across the United States. “Consumers deserve greater transparency around alternative sweeteners in […]

the sugar association

New ‘Take Action’ Web Site Makes It Easy for Parents & Consumers to Tell FDA to Stop Hiding Artificial Sweeteners in Our Food

September 10, 2020

Sweeping Reform of Labeling Regulations Needed to Help Families Monitor their Intake of Sugar Substitutes September 10, 2020 Washington, D.C. – Parents and other consumers who want to reduce, eliminate or monitor their exposure to alternative sweeteners in packaged foods and beverages now have a new and easy way to demand the placement of complete, […]

More Press Releases

Stay in Touch

Sign Up